Emission Inventories by Apparent Accounting

CEADs regularly publishes the latest CO2 Emission Inventories by using the Apparent Emission Accounting Approach for China and its 30 provinces and cities.

All emission inventories are compiled based on latest energy data revision (2015) by Chinese Statistics Bureau. Please note: due to methodology difference, results by using Apparent emission accounting approach and sectoral approach are sometimes slightly different. We are working on to reduce the difference as much as we can in a transparent way. 

National-level CO2 emission inventory (by Apparent Emission Accounting Method)

The CO2 emissions by apparent accounting are calculated based on apparent energy consumption data and the most up-to-data emission factors. Detailed description for emission inventory compilation methods and data can be found and referenced to our previous publication: Liu et al. (2015) “Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China Nature 524, pp. 335-338

carbon crunch

China’s carbon dioxide emissions will grow beyond the year 2030 unless it adopts strict low-carbon measures. Greater production efficiency, use of renewable energies and natural gas, and nationwide emissions-trading schemes can allow emissions to peak by 2030, and reduce national CO2 emissions by 30 gigatonnes (Gt) by 2035. Source: Climate Policy: Steps to China’s carbon peak Nature, 522, 279-281.

Download China CO2 Emission 2000 - 2014 calculated by using Apparent Accounting Approach. Please reference to and find method description at Liu et al. (2015) “Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China Nature 524, pp. 335-338

Provincial-level CO2 emission inventory (by Apparent Emission Accounting Approach)

Most of the provincial CO2 emissions were from raw coal, which is primarily burned in the thermal power sector. The analyses of per capita emissions and emission intensity in 2012 indicates that provinces located in the northwest and north had higher per capita CO2 emissions and emission intensities than the central and southeast coastal regions. Understanding the emissions and emission-socioeconomic characteristics of different provinces is critical for developing mitigation strategies.

Download Province CO2 emissions inventory 2000-2014. Please note there are some differences (up to 10%) of total emissions between 30 province aggregation and the national total. Please reference to and find method descriptions at Shan et al (2016) “New provincial CO2 emission inventories in China based on apparent energy consumption data and updated emission factors, Applied Energy.

2000 – 30 provincial aggregation -4.14% larger than national total.
2001 – 30 provincial aggregation -4.50% larger than national total.
2002 – 30 provincial aggregation -1.08% larger than national total.
2003 – 30 provincial aggregation -0.53% larger than national total.
2004 – 30 provincial aggregation -1.74% larger than national total.
2005 – 30 provincial aggregation 3.32% larger than national total.
2006 – 30 provincial aggregation 0.96% larger than national total.
2007 – 30 provincial aggregation -2.06% larger than national total.
2008 – 30 provincial aggregation 8.48% larger than national total.
2009 – 30 provincial aggregation 8.25% larger than national total.
2010 – 30 provincial aggregation 7.48% larger than national total.
2011 – 30 provincial aggregation 9.92% larger than national total.
2012 – 30 provincial aggregation 6.36% larger than national total.
2013 – 30 provincial aggregation 10.11% larger than national total (we are investigating Shanxi’s figure where the main inconsistency is from).
2014 – 30 provincial aggregation 18.42% larger than national total.